requiem - sōzuproject

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requiem

         requiem                                                                                                                                                                  


How is it possible to compose a music symbolizing life after death? Such a subject first seems weird, or perhaps morbid; but do not worry, it is absolutely not the case here, while listening to this splendid album from Italian artist Paolo Mascolini, aka Sōzu Project. And rather than inviting us to hear pure and simple, scary and alarming dark ambient music, the LP  invokes wonderful moments of luminous sparks, aesthetic qualities and hopes.
The first track, Body Bags, perfectly exposes the composer’s qualities of arranging. From synthetic string waves to a low, deep bass and various sound effects, an enlightened and intense environment is immediatly and amazingly settled. Sounds are connected to one another without being boring or too long. The extreme sample of atmospheres, which is quite difficult in this particular kind of melodies, is created with precise  and mature care. The challenge of ambient music being is, in the first part, not to annoy people, Paolo Mascolini plays his art as a reflection on funerals as much as afterlife in an unknown world.
The piano is also having an important part in here, being like the words and questions of a lost and anxious human being confronted to his/ her own death, and searching for a light or answers to existential questions. Personifying a reel individual, the instrument offers a place on this level, helping one travelling beyond the invisible ether of disembodied souls. Mixing actual sounds with 80′s synths, Sōzu Project invites each one of us to share this intimacy, going for a trip to lands where no word is said and no one is allowed to talk about death in order not to frighten the youngest or eldest people. Thus, this music releases one from the burden of death, thanks to subtle as much as comforting compositions. Dark Wings, however, contributes to create a latent fear but, while settled in the middle of the album, splendidly defines a compulsory way through the judgement door (Path). Helped by Lithuanian composer Nutedfoy on Flux, the musician opens himself to all possibilities, and enters into dark and admirable landscapes, thus creating a magnificent admiration, in such a fluid state that the album seems to be shorter than it really is, thanks to its density and charisma.
For those who are not familiar with ambient music, Requiem is a perfect introduction to the genre. For all the others, this extatic and impressive masterpiece is, obviously, highly recommended.

Raphaël DUPREZ

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